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Google 3D periodic table with diagrams

Google has created a periodic table of elements in 3D that allows you to see the atoms of the chemical elements. After you choose an element from the table, you can see its atomic structure. The model of representation is that of Bohr. To see the table you have to access the Experiments with Google platform at the address  https://artsexperiments.withgoogle.com/periodic-table/.  

The experiments of this platform are projects that transcend the boundaries of art, technology, design and culture. They are experiments that inspire, teach and delight.

Figure 1. Periodic table of the elements

Example of the Hydrogen atom

Hydrogen  is one of the most common elements in the universe and constitutes approximately 75% of its mass. The symbol by which it is represented is H and has an atomic mass of 1.00784 u. It was discovered by Henry Cavendish.

It uses an application that allows you to view and explore atomic models in Augmented Reality with Google ARCore. Many of us understand the basic structure of an atom: a nucleus containing protons (positively charged) and neutrons (neutrally charged), surrounded by (negatively charged) electrons in orbit. But how are those electrons organized? How do they move? What do they look like?. We can get an idea of how they are organized although it is far from reality by taking a look at the representation model.

Figure 2. Representation of the hydrogen atom

Classification of the elements in the periodic table

The 3D periodic table shows all elements classified by colors. We will find alkaline metals, terrestrial alkaline metals, post-transition metals, metalloids, non-reactive metals, noble gases, lanthanides, actinides and unknown chemical properties.

Figure 3. Periodic table highlighting lanthanides

In nature there is a continuity between the elements, it is passed from one to another according to changes in the atoms. We name each element for our eagerness to organize what is around us.

Proyecto Experiments with Google

Since 2009, programmers have created thousands of amazing experiments using Chrome, Android, AI, AR and more. Here we show projects, along with useful tools and resources, to inspire others to create new experiments. Here are collections of experiments to explore, with new additions each week. Some are a lot of fun. You can see all the experiments here -> https://experiments.withgoogle.com/experiments.

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